Police arrest man in 1976 Arizona murder case

Investigators in Arizona have arrested a man suspected of killing a woman in Tucson more than 35 years ago. Tucson police say 66-year-old Bruce McCullough has been charged with first-degree murder in the March 1976 death of 20-year-old Donna Smith. Authorities say the two had been living together as a couple. Detectives reviewing cold cases were able to track McCullough to San Diego and arrested him at his home last week. They say he avoided law enforcement for decades by using a fake identity but recently had been using his own name. Continue Reading

Police arrest man in 1976 Tucson murder case

Investigators in Arizona have arrested a man suspected of killing a woman in Tucson more than 35 years ago. Tucson police say 66-year-old Bruce McCullough has been charged with first-degree murder in the March 1976 death of 20-year-old Donna Smith. Authorities say the two had been living together as a couple. Detectives reviewing cold cases were able to track McCullough to San Diego and arrested him at his home last week. They say he avoided law enforcement for decades by using a fake identity but recently had been using his own name. Continue Reading

Southwest flight makes emergency landing due to unruly passengers, authorities say

A Southwest Airlines flight bound for Providence, R.I., made an emergency landing in South Carolina early Wednesday as the result of three unruly passengers, authorities said. The plane, which was carrying 134 passengers and 5 crew, departed from Orlando and landed at Charleston International Airport. The flight crew reported three passengers being disruptive and did not adhere to flight crew instructions, the Charleston County Aviation Authority said. On arrival the aircraft was met by law enforcement officers who removed the passengers from the aircraft, authorities said. No injuries were reported, and the aircraft departed without further incident. Continue Reading

Actions of 911 dispatcher 'under review' in Amanda Berry call

The 911 call made by Amanda Berry, one of three kidnap victims who police say were held in a Cleveland basement for a decade, is under review after possible procedural errors by the dispatcher. “While the call-taker complied with policies and procedures which enabled a very fast response by police, we have noted some concerns which will be the focus of our review, including the call-taker’s failure to remain on the line with Ms. Berry until police arrived on the scene,” Martin L. Flask, the director of the Cleveland Department of Public Safety told Fox8.com. In the 911 transcript, the operator interacts with Berry. At one point, after Berry asks for a police, the operator responds, “We’re going to send them as soon as we get a car open.” The call ends with the dispatcher assuring Berry that police are en route and said, ‘I told you they’re on their way; talk to them when they get there, OK.” Continue Reading

Search continues for missing Georgia college student

Family and friends of a Georgia college student missing for nearly two weeks passed out flyers on his college campus in hopes of finding information about his whereabouts. Campus police have said 19-year-old Jmaal Keyes was last seen April 25 on the campus of Middle Georgia State University in Cochran. His family reported him missing a few days later. Keyes, a college freshman, is from Austell. Keyes’ family has said he had no car or credit cards. Continue Reading

McDonald's tells Cleveland hero: 'We'll be in touch'

McDonald’s says it will reach out to a man widely quoted in accounts of the three women who were found in Cleveland after they went missing about a decade ago. Charles Ramsey, who lives in the neighborhood where the women were found, noted in an interview with a local TV station that he was eating McDonald’s when the scene unfolded Monday. He also made note of his meal in a 911 call. Both the interview and the 911 call went viral online. On Tuesday, the world’s biggest hamburger company said on Twitter: “We salute the courage of Ohio kidnap victims & respect their privacy. Continue Reading

Three parties to split $1M reward in case of fugitive ex-cop, LAPD says

The vast majority of the $1 million reward for ending the manhunt for Christopher Dorner will go to a couple who was tied up at gunpoint in their Big Bear cabin by the rogue ex-cop, Los Angeles police said Tuesday. The LAPD posted a document on its website in which a panel of three judges detailed the payouts for the much-sought reward. They decided about $800,000 will go to James and Karen Reynolds. Fifteen percent will go to Daniel McGowan, who found Dorner’s burning truck in the Big Bear area where he eventually was discovered, and 5 percent will go to tow-truck driver R.L. McDaniel, who spotted Dorner at a Corona gas station earlier in the manhunt and reported the sighting. The $1 million reward was announced by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa during Dorner’s rampage in February. Continue Reading

Texas inmate executed for fatal drug-deal robbery

A Texas death row inmate convicted of killing a fellow drug dealer while robbing him outside of a Waco convenience store 10 years ago was executed Tuesday evening. In the seconds before being injected with a lethal dose of pentobarbital, Carroll Joe Parr told the wife of his victim that she should talk to her brother and that he would “tell you the truth about what happened to your husband.” Then he said he had a “statement to the world.” He said he was “in the midst of the truth.” “I am good. Continue Reading

NY officials vow attack on predatory debt-fixing

Federal authorities announced a crackdown Tuesday on predatory businesses that cheat “desperate and vulnerable” people harmed by the 2008 financial crisis with phony promises to consolidate their debt. U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara told a news conference that charges were brought against the owner and three employees of a New York company that cheated over 1,200 customers nationwide after opening its doors in 2009. They were indicted on charges of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, along with separate mail and wire fraud charges. He said Mission Settlement Agency promised to help people harmed by the economic collapse for a $49 monthly fee but instead often made them worse as it made $2.2 million in fees from customers it did not help while taking in more than $6.6 million in fees in all. “The true mission of Mission turned out to be fraud and deceit,” he said. Continue Reading