Hofstra student was killed by police, authorities say

A Hofstra University student being held in a headlock at gunpoint by an intruder was accidently shot and killed by a police officer who had responded to the home invasion at an off-campus home, police said Saturday. Junior public relations major Andrea Rebello was shot once in the head early Friday morning by an officer who opened fire after the masked intruder pointed a gun at the officer while holding the 21-year-old student, Nassau County homicide squad Lt. John Azzata said. In a tense confrontation with the officer, gunman Dalton Smith “menaces our police officer, points his gun at the police officer,” Azzata said. The officer opened fire, killing Smith and his hostage. Azzata said the Nassau County police officer fired eight shots at Smith, who police described as having an “extensive” criminal background. Continue Reading

Alaska volcano shoots lava up hundreds of feet

Alaska’s remote Pavlof Volcano was shooting lava hundreds of feet into the air, but its ash plume was thinning Saturday and no longer making it dangerous for airplanes to fly nearby. A narrow ash plume extends a couple hundred miles southeast from the volcano, which is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage, said Geologist Chris Waythomas of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. The eruption that began Monday seemed to be slowing on Saturday, but Waythomas said that could change at any time. “Things could ramp up quickly,” he said. There are no flight restrictions because of the eruption, but pilots are being told to use caution and pay attention, Waythomas said. Continue Reading

Winning ticket for record Powerball jackpot sold in Florida, lottery official says

It’s all about the odds, and one single ticket in Florida has beaten them all by matching all the numbers to win the highest Powerball jackpot in history at an estimated $590.5 million, lottery officials said early Sunday. The lone winner was sold at a Publix supermarket location in Zephyrhills, Fla., according to Florida Lottery executive Cindy O’Connell. She told The Associated Press by telephone that more details would be released later. The winner was not immediately identified publicly and she did not give any indication hours after Saturday’s drawing whether anyone had already stepped forward with the ticket. “This would be the sixth Florida Powerball winner and right now, it’s the sole winner of the largest ever Powerball jackpot,” O’Connell told AP. Continue Reading

Hofstra student was killed by police, authorities say

A New York college student being held by an armed home intruder was shot and killed by a Nassau County police officer who had responded to a report of a home invasion at an off-campus home, police said Saturday. Andrea Rebello was shot once in the head Friday morning by an officer who opened fire after the masked intruder, Dalton Smith, pointed a gun at the officer while holding the 21-year-old junior in a headlock, Nassau County homicide squad Lt. John Azzata said. The Nassau County police officer fired eight shots at Smith, who has what police have described as an “extensive” criminal background, Azzata said. Smith was hit by seven bullets and died. Rebello was shot once in the head, Azzata said. Continue Reading

Federal report documents inmate sex abuse in US

A new federal report says inmates at jails in Indianapolis, Baltimore, St. Louis and Philadelphia face the nation’s highest levels of sexual abuse at the hands of guards. The U.S. Department of Justice’s report says the Marion County Jail in Indianapolis had the nation’s highest rate of inmate sex abuse by staff. Its 7.7 percent abuse rate was well above the 1.8 percent average abuse rate among all jails based on inmate surveys from February 2011 to May 2012. The Baltimore City Detention Center had the second-highest abuse rate by guards at 6.7 percent. Continue Reading

Alaska volcano shoots lava up hundreds of feet

Alaska’s remote Pavlof Volcano has been shooting lava hundreds of feet into the air, but its ash plume is thinning and is no longer making it dangerous for airplanes to fly nearby. Geologist Chris Waythomas of the Alaska Volcano Observatory says a narrow ash plume extends a couple hundred miles southeast from the volcano, which is 625 miles southwest of Anchorage. The eruption that began Monday seemed to be slowing on Saturday, but Waythomas says that could change at any time. He says seismic tremors from the 8,262-foot volcano have been going up and down, but remain at a fairly high level. Scientists are not expecting the eruption to end anytime soon but so far it has not been explosive. Continue Reading

50 to 60 injured after car drives into hikers at Virginia parade, emergency official says

About 50 to 60 people were injured Saturday when a driver described by witnesses as an elderly man drove his car into a group of hikers marching in a parade in a small Virginia mountain town. It happened around 2:10 p.m. during the Hikers Parade at the Trail Days festival, an annual celebration of the Appalachian Trail in Damascus, near the Tennessee state line about a half-hour drive east of Bristol. Washington County director of emergency management Pokey Harris said no fatalities had been reported. The injuries ranged from critical to superficial, he said. Three of the victims were flown by helicopters to regional hospitals. Continue Reading

Funeral held for mom, son found dead in home

Funeral services have been held for the New Jersey woman and boy whose bodies were found in their home after a 37-hour hostage standoff last weekend. The Times of Trenton (http://bit.ly/113Q2dJ) reports Carmenlita Stevens’ four surviving children were among those attending Saturday’s service for the 44-year-old woman and her 12-year-old son, Quavon Foster. Stevens’ boyfriend had held three of the surviving children hostage during the standoff. Authorities have said Stevens and Foster died from stab wounds on April 25, nearly three weeks before the standoff began May 10. It ended two days later when hostage-taker Gerald Tyrone Murphy was fatally shot in the head by police who stormed the home. Continue Reading

After nearly 30 years, Camp Lejeune coming clean

Purple wildflowers sprout in abundance around the bright-yellow pipe, one of several jutting from the sandy soil in this unassuming patch of grass and mud. A dirty hose runs from the pipe to an idling truck and into a large tank labeled, “NON-POTABLE WATER.” This is the former Hadnot Point fuel farm, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune’s main fuel depot until it was ordered closed in the 1980s. At one point, a layer of gasoline 15 feet thick floated atop the groundwater here, and this “fluid vapor recovery” truck is part of the continuing effort to remove it. “He’s skimming that contaminate out of that well, into this tank,” civilian Bob Lowder, head of environmental quality for the base, said during a recent tour. Continue Reading