Boston bombing suspect confined to small cell with steel door

The Boston Marathon bombing suspect is being held in a small cell with a steel door at a federal medical detention center about 40 miles outside the city, a federal official said Saturday. Federal Medical Center Devens spokesman John Collauti described the conditions under which 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was being held in the Ayer facility after being moved there from a hospital Friday. Tsarnaev was injured during a police chase Thursday in which his brother, also a suspect in the bombing, was fatally wounded. Collauti said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press that Tsarnaev is in secure housing where authorities can monitor him. His cell has a solid steel door with an observation window and a slot for passing food and medication. Continue Reading

Part found near World Trade Center from Boeing jet

A rusted piece of airplane landing gear discovered wedged between a mosque and an apartment building and believed to be from one of the hijacked planes that destroyed the nearby World Trade Center on Sept. 11 has been confirmed as coming from the type of Boeing jet used in the attacks. Police said Saturday that detectives had been in contact with officials at Chicago-based Boeing Co. who confirmed the wreckage was from a Boeing 767. Police have said the landing gear had a clearly visible Boeing identification number. Continue Reading

Attorneys in Trayvon Martin case address media

The attorneys in the Trayvon Martin shooting say social media gives people a way to stay engaged in high profile cases that was not possible years ago. Speaking were Benjamin Crump, the attorney for Trayvon Martin’s parents, and George Zimmerman’s defense attorney, Mark O’Mara. They were talking Saturday at the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Banquet in Orlando. O’Mara says he would prefer to “do away with all media” in a criminal case, but “that’s a fantasy that is 40 years ago.” Crump says social media has given people who normally would not have a voice a way to be engaged in the case. Continue Reading

Russia had wiretap on Boston Marathon bombing suspect, US officials say

Russian authorities secretly recorded a telephone conversation in 2011 in which one of the Boston bombing suspects vaguely discussed jihad with his mother, officials said Saturday, days after the U.S. government finally received details about the call. In another conversation, the mother of now-dead bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was recorded talking to someone in southern Russia who is under FBI investigation in an unrelated case, officials said. The conversations are significant because, had they been revealed earlier, they might have been enough evidence for the FBI to initiate a more thorough investigation of the Tsarnaev family. As it was, Russian authorities told the FBI only that they had concerns that Tamerlan and his mother were religious extremists. With no additional information, the FBI conducted a limited inquiry and closed the case in June 2011. Continue Reading

Moody's, S&P settle lawsuits over debt ratings

Ratings agencies Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and investment bank Morgan Stanley have settled two lawsuits dating back to the financial crisis that accused them of hiding risky investments. The lawsuits from King County in Washington state and Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank claimed that the ratings agencies and Morgan Stanley hid the risk of investing in a fund that purchased bonds backed by subprime mortgages. Judge Shira Scheindlin dismissed the lawsuits on Friday, in federal court in New York, with prejudice, which means they can’t be filed again. Spokesmen for the McGraw-Hill Cos., which owns S&P, Moody’s Corp. and Morgan Stanley confirmed the settlements but did not disclose terms. McGraw-Hill spokesman Jason Feuchtwanger said the cases were settled without any admission of liability or wrongdoing. Continue Reading

Memphis mayor says police union's 'danger' billboards hurting city's image

The mayor of Memphis said billboards put up by the Memphis Police Association are hurting the city’s image and calls the message, “selfish.” The police union billboards feature the warning, “DANGER: Enter at your own risk; This city does not support public safety,” MyFoxMemphis.com reported. Mike Williams, the president of the MPA, said the billboards are meant to target city leaders and are about protecting union’s jobs and benefits. “I think it’s self-centered, I think it’s selfish,” Memphis Mayor A C Wharton said. “I think it has no place in our city.” Continue Reading

Leader of Cuban opposition group visits exiles

One of the founders of a Cuban opposition group awarded Europe’s top human rights prize is meeting with exiles in Miami. Berta Soler will visit the Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies at the University of Miami on Saturday. Soler is a co-founder of the Ladies in White, a group of wives and mothers formed in 2003 after the arrests of 75 government opponents. The Cuban government has detained the women from time to time and sent pro-government crowds to shout at them. But their demonstrations proved successful. Continue Reading

4 kids, adult killed in Georgia fire, officials say

One adult and four young children have been killed in an early morning fire in a Georgia city about 30 miles southwest of Atlanta. A spokesman for the state insurance commissioner says a call about the fire came in at 1:17 a.m. Saturday. Glenn Allen says Insurance Commissioner Ralph Hudgens has ruled the fire accidental. He says the origin was an electrical panel in the home’s den area. Allen says 27-year-old Alonna T. McCrary, 5-year-old daughter Eriel McCrary and 2-year-old daughter Nikia White were killed in the fire. Continue Reading

Iranian scientist returns after release from US

An Iranian scientist held by the U.S. since late 2011 has returned to Iran. The scientist, Mojtaba Atarodi said U.S. authorities had treated him “generally well.” The microchip expert at Tehran’s high profile Sharif University, Atarodi was in U.S. custody since December 2011 over allegations he bought high-tech equipment in violation of U.S. sanctions on Iran. Atarodi arrived home via Oman, a Gulf state which has served as a mediator between Washington and Tehran before. In 2012, the U.S. released Iranian national Shahrzad Mir Gholikhan after she spent five years in U.S. detention The U.S. has a history of occasional arrest and release of Iranian citizens on similar charges. Continue Reading