Dead bomb suspect had wounds 'head to toe,' doctor says

A doctor involved in treating the Boston Marathon bombing suspect who died in a gunbattle with police says he had injuries head to toe and all limbs intact when he arrived at the hospital. Dr. David Schoenfeld said 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev was unconscious and had so many penetrating wounds when he arrived at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center early Friday that it isn’t clear which ones killed him, and a medical examiner will have to determine the cause of death. The second bombing suspect, 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was in serious condition at the same hospital after his capture Friday night. The FBI has not allowed hospital officials to say any more about his wounds or condition. Schoenfeld lives in the Boston suburb of Watertown and heard explosions from the shootout between the two brothers and police early Friday. Continue Reading

Police: Shots fired at Colo. pot holiday gathering

Denver police say one person has been shot in the leg and another is down with unknown injuries after shots were fired at a marijuana celebration held to mark the counterculture holiday 4/20. Witnesses say they heard three or more shots about 20 minutes after 4:20 p.m. Police swarmed the scene, and crime tape was around the pavilion where the celebration was being held. Aerial footage showed the massive crowd frantically running from the park. The pot celebration Saturday was the first since Colorado and Washington made marijuana legal for recreational use. A sizable police force on motorcycles and horses watched the celebration. Continue Reading

Police: Suspects used carjack victim's ATM card

Police say the Boston Marathon bombing suspects used their carjacking victim’s ATM card before a gunfight with authorities. Watertown Police Chief Edward Deveau says the suspects also told the carjacking victim they bombed Monday’s race and killed a police officer. A car chase and shootout ensued when a Watertown officer saw the two brothers in different cars and followed them. The suspects exchanged gunfire with police, wounding a transit officer and tossing a bomb and two hand grenades. Deveau says Tamerlan Tsarnaev (tsahr-NEYE’-ehv) ran out of ammunition and police tackled him, before Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-KHAR’ tsahr-NEYE’-ehv) drove the carjacking victim’s Mercedes toward them. Continue Reading

Czechs: we're not Chechens

A number of comments by Americans on social media mistaking the Czech Republic for the country of origin of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects — ethnic Chechen brothers — prompted the Czech ambassador to the United States to act. In a statement posted on the embassy Web site, Petr Gandalovic said “the Czech Republic and Chechnya are two very different entities — the Czech Republic is a Central European country; Chechnya is a part of the Russian Federation.” Gandalovic calls it “a most unfortunate misunderstanding,” but some responses on Twitter are less diplomatic. Mirca Sekerova recommends Americans “open a geography book once in a while…stop blaming our country for this.” And Petr Manda commented: “Well done, U.S. education system.” Continue Reading

Second Boston marathon suspect reportedly partied 2 nights after bombing

The teenage bombing suspect who was captured Friday night hiding in a boat in the Watertown neighborhood near Boston reportedly attended a party at two nights after the incident, The Boston Globe reported. “He was just relaxed,” said a student from Umass Dartmouth who saw the suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, mingling with friends from intramural soccer. Tsarnaev is registered at the school and the campus sent out an alert on its website Friday saying, “The campus is closed. Individuals on campus should shelter in place unless instructed otherwise.” Several students were interviewed in the report and expressed disbelief that their fellow classmate was a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing that killed three and injured over 180 people. Continue Reading

NYC race beefs up security after Boston Marathon bombing

New York Road Runners is enhancing baggage security measures for a 4-mile race on Sunday in Central Park in response to the Boston Marathon bombings — and the New York City police department is bringing in extra cameras for added surveillance. The NYPD purchased 100 mobile cameras it will use at the race as a result of the bombings, NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said Friday. There will also be significantly increased police presence at the race as well as at a 5K run/walk to the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum on Sunday, he said. Runners were being encouraged not to bring bags to the City Parks Foundation Run for the Parks, but people who do will be asked to put all their belongings in a clear, plastic bag provided by race officials. Continue Reading

California failed to spend $455M on water projects, EPA says

California has failed to spend $455 million of federal money meant to improve water infrastructure in the state, while thousands of people rely on groundwater laced with nitrates and other contaminants, federal regulators said Friday. The state has received more than $1.5 billion for its Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund over the past 15 years, but has failed to spend a large part of it in a timely manner, according to a noncompliance letter from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to the state’s public health department. The amount is the program’s largest unspent sum in the nation, the EPA said. The fund gives out loans to public and private water systems for drinking water infrastructure improvements, including treatment facilities, pipelines and other projects. In recent years, California has received an estimated $80 million in federal money annually for the fund. Continue Reading

Scant evidence in Mississippi ricin case, attorney says

Federal authorities have scant evidence linking a Mississippi man to the mailing of ricin-laced letters to the president and a senator, his attorney says. Christi McCoy said after a court hearing Friday that the government has offered no evidence to prove her client, Paul Kevin Curtis, had possession of any ricin or the seed from which it is extracted — castor beans. An FBI agent testified during the hearing that he could not say if investigators had found ricin at Curtis’ home, and McCoy said the evidence linking the 45-year-old to the crime so far has hinged on his writings posted online. He is adamant that he did not do this, and she said she has seen nothing to prove him wrong. Curtis was ushered into the courtroom before the hearing began in an orange jail jumpsuit and shackles. Continue Reading

Proposed Illinois Concealed Carry Law Would Exempt Chicago

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — A key Illinois senator says legislation allowing public gun possession will carve out an exception for Chicago.  

Republican Senator Tim Bivins says the measure he and Democratic Senator Kwame Raoul  negotiated would allow Cook County authorities to deny a concealed carry permit even if an applicant passes the required background checks. The former county sheriff from Dixon says the rest of the state would be governed by a so-called “shall issue” law — anyone meeting requirements would get a carry permit. Bivins says the bill is being written. Continue Reading